The Great Zu-dini!

Sometimes I think I should take my show on the road as a Substitution Magician. After 4 years of eating to manage my weight and then adding blood glucose management to that a year ago, it feels as if I have found a substitute for nearly all of my favorite foods. Some did not require much effort, like substituting low carb flour tortillas for regular flour tortillas or egg beaters for real eggs. Other favorites, such as spaghetti and mashed potatoes proposed a much larger challenge for my “skills.” However, as the saying goes, where there’s a will, there’s a way!

True magic is made when you actually believe your substitution is better than the real deal. I can’t pinpoint when this magic happens, but, stick with it long enough and it really does happen. I was discussing this with a colleague in our office kitchen one morning. She was heating up her homemade pumpkin oatmeal (utterly AMAZING) and I was making my regular breakfast burrito. Both breakfasts included a sophisticated level of substitutions; however, we agreed that even if we could eat the “originals” our concoctions were based on, we would actually choose our alternatives. Magic! Our assumption was this…. somewhere along the way in our journey to make life changes (the only way weight loss can healthfully be achieved and maintained) we actually realized that our new food choices made us feel better.  Four days into my efforts my daily heart burn disappeared, for good.  About 4 weeks into my efforts I noticed how much better I was sleeping.  A couple of months (and a handful of pounds lighter) into it and  the constant dull ache in my hips and knees was gone.  The sensation of feeling better, feeling younger, began to carry more importance than eating the foods that tasted better. The WLDS (Weight Loss Deprivation Syndrome) and the DDS (Diabetic Deprivation Syndrome) began to dissipate and give way to a feeling of being in control for once.  I realized that the only thing I was depriving my body of was heart burn, aches, pains, sleeplessness and the list goes on….. and as for those things, I was more than happy to live without them.  As for everything else….. a substitute had to exist!

Mashed cauliflower became mashed potatoes in my house. Now the entire family and extended family prefers the substitution. My substitution for spaghetti has also become a fan favorite.  Now, remember the only 2 rules I enforce when sharing recipes…. approach with an open mind and don’t-knock-it-til-you-try-it.  Zucchini is the substitution for noodles in my spaghetti.  Yes, zucchini….. or as I like to call it…. The Great Zu-dini!  Zucchini has been a staple of my diet for a very long time.  I like to use thin slices of zucchini as “chips” for my dip.  I love to saute it with baby portobello mushrooms with a little shredded romano cheese sprinkled it.  Zucchini also makes wonderful zucchini fries (I use olive oil and about 1/2 c. flour). I can even make mini pizzas with zucchini serving as the crust (George Stella’s Good Carb Family Cookbook’s Pizza Stuffed Zucchini Bites).  Zucchini, a required prop for any seasoned Substitution Magician, deserves the title The Great Zu-dini.

Spaghini……. (spaghetti with zucchini) 6 servings; Per serving: 4 Weight Watchers Points, 24 g carbs, 5 g fiber

8-10 zucchini (speared and cut in 1/2)

2 cartons sliced mushrooms

1 lb 96% fat free ground beef  

1 sweet yellow onion, chopped

1 lg can (26 1/2 oz) low carb spaghetti sauce (I uses Del Monte Green Pepper & Mushroom)

6 Tbsp reduced fat grated parmesan cheese

Cut zucchini into spears about 3-4 inches long and steam until crisp-tender.  Spray large skillet with cooking spray and saute mushrooms and onions.  Add ground beef to mushrooms and onions, brown and drain.  Return meat mixture back to skillet and add can of spaghetti sauce and heat.   Spoon 1 cup zucchini into 6 bowls. Scoop about 3/4 cup spaghetti sauce mixture on top of zucchini and top with 1 Tbsp reduced fat grated parmesan cheese.  Enjoy!

Are you new to the substitution game or are you an old pro?  What is your favorite substitution for your favorite food?  I look forward to hearing…. I need a good idea for dinner tonight!

Have a wonderful week!

The Dishing Diabetic

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This is Your Brain On….. Fat?

Fried_20eggsLet me see if I have got this right……

Obesity is a leading risk factor for heart disease and heart disease can kill you?  Check.

Obesity is a leading risk factor for hypertension and hypertension can cause a stroke that can kill you?  Check.

Obesity is a leading risk factor for type II diabetes and type II diabetes, untreated, can lead to retinopathy (blindness), neuropathy (nerve damage that can lead to amputations), nephropathy (kidney disease), heart disease and stroke and most of those things can kill you?  Check.

Obesity causes severe brain degeneration and severe brain degeneration can…. WAIT, hold up just one second, severe WHAT? Being obese can actually shrink my brain?  Oh, this I gotta hear!

Apparently, a new study concludes that obese individuals, indentified as those with a Body Mass Index (BMI calculator) greater than 30, have 8% less brain tissue and their brain looks 16 years older than the brain of someone who is not obese.  The study goes on to say that individuals who are overweight (BMI>25) have 4% less brain tissue and their brain is 8 years older comparatively.  Brain scans of 94 70-year olds produced this study’s results.

This brain degeneration leaves the individual with an increased risk for Alzheimer’s and other brain diseases.  In addition, the areas that experience the tissue degeneration in obese individuals are responsible for planning, memory, attention, movement and executive functions.  In overweight individuals the affected areas are responsible for sensory functions.  The senior author of the study, Paul Thompson, says if you can eat healthy and manage your weight, you can significantly reduce your risk for Alzheimer’s.

When you consider the growing list of health risks associated with being obese or overweight and realize that the World Health Organization reports 300 million people worldwide are obese and another 1 BILLION are overweight, it is easy to see that we have a problem of pandemic proportions.  Poor eating habits is the biggest culprit causing obesity.  The good news is that this is something that could be changed.  The question is how.

Do you remember those public service announcements where they put the egg in the frying pan and that very deep, very serious voice-over voice said, “this is your brain on drugs?”  Is the next step a PSA with the announcement, “this is your brain on…..fat?”

In the 6th grade, my class attended a Just Say No presentation (yep, the good ole Reagan Era).  The speaker told a story about an 18 year old drafted into the NBA who tried cocaine for the 1st time at a party, died of an overdose and never saw the fruits of a career playing basketball.   This story played a pivotal role in my choices for years to come.  Eventually we have to confront our food and drink choices just as we approach our decisions not to use other harmful substances….. eventually we have to see the fit vs. fat debate as a health debate NOT a vanity debate.  Do we need a national campaign?  Do we need a First Lady to come along and declare a War on Fat?  This may not be too far off when you read 5 Bucks for a Can of Coke. Is the government’s answer to tax the foods that are “bad” for us?  Will that be enough of a deterrent (tobacco tax has increased exponentially over the last decade with very little impact on the number of people smoking)? At what point do we make good decisions because they are good for our health?

This is a very serious problem and it is also a very sensitive one.  I am a type II diabetic who spent the majority of my 20’s with a BMI of 40. I feel that I have a responsibility to discuss the obesity epidemic and its bedfellows: type 2 diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and now, brain degeneration. My perspective on this topic is from a type 2 diabetic, who has spent 1/3 of her life obese, who smoked for 10 years and spent the majority of those same 10 years completely sedentary with a total cholesterol count of 282.  I have been a fat girl and once a fat girl, always a fat girl….. no matter what the scale says (if you have been there, you know exactly what I am talking about….. that’s a topic for another post).  My approach to the obesity epidemic is devoid of judgment or discrimination….. I have been there.  However, no one can fight this battle for us, we, each one of us, one by one, has to decide that the health risks are just not worth it.

What do you think the answer is? What needs to be created or put into place that will welp reverse this deadly trend?

The Dishing Diabetic

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Dress Up Your Diet… Stella Style!

Two of my biggest life changing decisions took place in August 2002 while visiting Seattle, Washington. First, I accepted my best friend’s proposal of marriage. Second (a result of the first), my official weight loss battle began. The minute I returned home I joined Weight Watchers and picked a date (yes, in that order). It also seems that somewhere in this same period of time I began accumulating an obnoxious cookbook collection. I feel like I have every Weight Watchers cookbook known to mankind. Then there are the mexican food cookbooks. The seafood cookbooks make a healthy showing as well. Ahhhhhh, and where would be without the dessert cookbooks? Although I will sing all of these cookbooks’ praises, a good deal of their contents have become obsolete when trying to master a diabetic diet. As I have said before, it is much easier to make a fatty food low fat or a high sugar food low sugar; it is far more difficult to make a high carb food low carb.

As I embarked on the challenge to once again overhaul my eating habits, I was too insecure to deviate from any food that did not have a nutrition label that offered the exact number of carbohydrates. Cooking proved difficult as a “rookie” diabetic because I was constantly “googling” my ingredients for their carbohydrate count. On a trip to see my mother-in-law, she gave me a low carb cookbook (that she purchased on QVC; don’t know why, but that makes me chuckle). Nine months later, this is still the only low carb cookbook I own. My goal is to try each of the recipes before I begin acquiring enough low carb cookbooks to start my own bookstore, as I am destined to do. This goal has proven worthwhile with each recipe I prepare. I LOVE this cookbook…… George Stella’s Good Carb Family Cookbook (http://www.stellastyle.com/). Mr. Stella has labeled his approach to eating and weight management Stella Style…… and what a style it is!

The story behind this cookbook (http://stellastyle.com/newPM/cgi/pm.cgi?action=show&temp=story&session=session) is as fabulous as the cookbook itself. George, his wife and 2 sons lost a total of over 560 lbs when they started living la vida Stella Style! I am amazed that this book is full of low carb recipes that ANYBODY (not just a diabetic) would go for a second serving of in a heartbeat! I also greatly appreciate George’s Tips that accompany many of the recipes and instruct you how to make the dish lower fat, easier prep or additions/substitutions that can enhance the final product.

I am a breakfast kind of gal. As I think back to pre-diagnosis, I am pretty sure it has always been my favorite meal of the day. However, after the discovery of Mr. Stella’s breakfast recipes, I am certain, post-diagnosis, that breakfast is my soul mate in the food universe! I can take my soul mate any time of day….. morning, noon, or night…… that is what I call true love!!

As I progress through more Stella Style recipes in other meal categories, I will highlight my favorites; but for now, here are a few absolutley delectible breakfasts, Stella Style of course……

Apple Wlanut Pancakes
Shrimply Delicious Frittata
Mushroom Swiss Muffin Cap Omelets
Blueberry Breakfast Pan Bread

Just typing the names of the these recipes makes my mouth water. A few notes: I use Egg Beaters in place of eggs, olive oil cooking spray in place of olive oil, reduced fat sausage, light sour cream, and light cheese (you will notice these suggestions in George’s Tips). These small adjustments have a big effect on the fat count for these items, no effect on the taste (in my opinion) and the outcome helps us type II diabetics manage our blood sugar, weight and heart health! That is like hitting the tri-fecta of diabetes management!

If you are eating Stella Style, let me know what your favorites are!

Have a wonderful week!

The Dishing Diabetic

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Take This Guarantee and Shove It!

If you are diabetic and have taken to the internet, then you know there is a TON of information out there. It also seems as if most diabetes websites have a “community” aspect to them where you can create your own profile, establish a blog, network with new friends and chat via message boards….. kind of like a diabetic Facebook! The sites are nothing short of a lifeline for both diabetic “rookies” and “lifers.” I troll through the many message boards observing the themes associated with the different stages of type 2 diabetes. I do occasionally comment with the intent to ask a question, answer a question, share a recipe, offer encouragement, etc. I do have 2 rules in the thoughts I put out there 1) no negativity and 2) no confrontations. Yesterday, I semi-broke #2.

I read a message board entry that stated that all diabetic will experience complications, especially if diagnosed young How do you NOT confront that statement? It is like it reached out of the computer and slapped me in the face. If that is true, why am I counting Weight Watchers Points, counting carbohydrates, pricking my find 4-5x/ day, exercising like a mad woman, and why is a blog like this even necessary? Well, I’ll tell you why…. because, despite what my precious 15 year old stepdaughter says, I AM young. I was 31 when I had borderline gestational diabetes and I was 33 when I was diagnosed with type II. I am young and I know diabetic complications are not guaranteed to be part of my future. And, young or old (aka young at heart), I want you to know that the same goes for you!

That statement, even in all its inaccuracy, did raise a few thoughts about the nature of diabetic complications and how we are instructed to prevent them. Many of us have WONDERFUL physicians, I personally have the BEST ; ). However, due to the nature of their job, they give us a glucometer and refer us to a class or individual nutritionist where we learn how many carbs to eat, what kind to eat, when to check our blood glucose and the recommended ranges for blood sugar. Many of us walk away with the assumption that managing our blood glucose is all we need to do to prevent diabetic complications, I know I did. Good thing I am married to a medical student!

Mr. Man, a 3rd year med student, attended a luncheon this week featuring a leading endocrinologist. This gentleman discussed how doctors must begin coaching their diabetic patients to do more than just manage blood sugar. The management of blood sugar is for 3 things in particular – preventing neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. These are 3 very serious common complications of diabetes; but, there are many others and 2 biggies are heart disease and stroke. As a diabetic, preventing heart disease and stroke goes beyond just managing my blood sugar. I, personally, needed to lose 85 lbs (I have 35 more to go). I had to use both diet and exercise so that I would lower my cholesterol (now 150, down from 282 – without medication), lower my blood pressure (now 102/78 without medication), lower my A1c (now 6.1, down from 7.2 without medication) AND lose weight. I am lucky that I quit smoking 3 years ago or smoking cessation would have been added to my to-do list. Obesity, lack of exercise, hyperglycemia and smoking are huge risk factors for heart disease and stroke and managing blood glucose only addresses the hyperglycemia. The guest speaker’s point was received loud and clear: If an diabetic does not lose weight, lower their cholesterol, stop smoking, and/or start exercising they will die from a heart attack or stroke; but, hey, their blood sugar will be on target.

I was diagnosed 10 months ago and just learning to control my blood sugar was all I could handle. About 3 months in I began the weight loss and exercising. You have to start somewhere with baby steps, one at a time. Tackling it all at once would have left me feeling overwhelmed and frustrated…… 2 emotions that are not helpful in the world of managing diabetes and preventing its complications. This is a marathon, not a sprint, and it requires more than just monitoring your blood glucose. My suggestion is to create a timeline for your attack on diabetes. How many months will you focus on learning what foods you can eat and how they affect your blood sugar? When will you begin exercising (what kind, how often, etc)? Once you have that habit in place, when and how will you begin smoking cessation? Give yourself time to adjust to each new baby step and then take the next step. As you step in the ring to fight the good fight…. know there is hope; the proof is in the #’s….. 80% of diabetic complications are preventable! You will find many, many others at all stages of the marathon and most will want to help and encourage you; and, when you are ready to take the next step and add weight loss, exercise, and/or smoking cessation…… well, we will be here for that, too!

Yes, as diabetics we have to do so much more that just monitoring our BG to stay healthy and prevent complications…… but, the good news is that these complications, 80% of them, are preventable. I broke my #2 rule, no confontations regarding others’ posts….. but I felt the message was worth every word!

Have a wonderful weekend!

The Dishing Diabetic

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Use Protection! Cover Your (sushi) Roll in Cucumber…

If you read my blog on The Deadly Diabetic Diablo burger (https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/18/the-tale-of-the-deadly-diabetic-diablo-burger/), you know my feelings on The Travel Channel’s program MAN V. FOOD. I find it to be some twisted form of tortuous punishment for a type II diabetic. This evening I found the show’s host eating mass quantities of a food I CAN NOT LIVE WITHOUT and that I can still eat as often as I want to (guilt free!) – sushi, specifically spicy tuna rolls.

A little background: Nine years ago I was living near the gulf coast in a city that had no shortage of seafood or sushi restaurants. I was dating Mr. Man and he was playing a pretty good game of hard to get….. only allowing one date a week and these usually took place on Sunday nights. These “date nights” quickly took on a very predictable routine. Mr. Man would come over for dinner and a movie. He would begin these evenings begging me to go eat sushi with him. Seafood has been my favorite food for as long as I can remember…… but, I must empahsize – I only ate my seafood cooked and had never even entertained the alternative.

It took about 3 months of begging to wear me down. Well, if I am completely honest, it may have been 3 months of his playing hard to get had made me a level of desperate that I never knew existed. Either way, I caved and found myself sitting at a local sushi bar. Mr. Man was exceptionally kind in the items he chose to order, even though he started the evening tricking me into eating a bit of wasabi (japanese horseradish). There was a tiger eye roll (smoked salmon, cream cheese and jalapeno), a spicy tuna roll with avocado, and an eel/avocado roll; you could also call this the Sushi Beginners Menu. I LOVED every bite and a sushi addict was born!! *I am pretty sure this is when he decided to quit playing hard to get! ; )

Although sushi can pack a punch to your pocketbook, it does not add to your waistline or backside. When I decided I was tired of being fat (my story:https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/who-is-the-dishing-diabetic/), sushi became a staple in my journey to lose 93 lbs. Most sushi items are low points on the Weight Watchers plan, low fat, high protein and DELICIOUS. I have not found any scientific evidence to support my next claim, but it’s my story and I’m sticking to it….. sushi just flat makes me happy. My assumption is it either sets off chemical reactions that release endorphines, contains “happy” vitamins and minerals OR the fact that I can eat A LOT of it without guilt results in the emotional experience that accompanies my trips to the sushi bar…… I don’t really care how it happens, it just does.

As most of you reading this can relate, my diagnosis of type II diabetes was like a machete to the list of my favorite foods. That list was sliced and diced to a point where very few foods remained that were diabetic friendly. One food that shined like a beacon on that list….. SUSHI! Rice? Doesn’t sushi have rice, you ask? Nope! Your don’t need no stinkin’ rice to enjoy sushi!! Allelujah!! Sushi restaurants are bottomless treasure chests of delectible food choices and the beauty is that you can taylor your choices to fit your needs.

How is this possible? 1st of all, you can ask to have your favorite rolls wrapped in cucumber. A spicy tuna roll with avocado wrapped in cucumber is pure bliss and my blood sugar loves it, too! Or, try asking for a bowl of seaweed salad, avocado and your favorite fish in it (mine is salmon, tuna and yellow tail). Oh, and have them put a little spicy sauce in it! Also, look for thin-sliced peppered tuna on the appetizer menu; the thin sliced yellow tail is wonderful, too! Both are fabulous with spicy ponzu sauce. I also eat pieces of salmon, smoked salmon, tuna, super white tuna, sea bass, flounder, and yellow tail sashimi style…. meaning no rice. I will tell you though, I did not graduate to the sashimi until I had worked my way through Beginner’s sushi (rolls) and intermediate sushi (the seaweed salad). Sushi is like wine…. you acquire the taste for it and that tast just grows and grows and GROWS! I now enjoy it all and so does my weight loss plan AND my diabetes management plan! ** I do not eat sushi items that include “tempura” ingredients as that means “fried”**

If you have tried sushi and know it is not for you, I understand. However, if you are like I was 9 long years ago and claim you do not like it (but you have never tried it), I urge you, RUN, don’t walk to a sushi bar close to you. Take a sushi eater with you and do not hesitate to ask your sushi companion (or your server) any question you have. Sushi addicts LOVE to help bring another sushi addict into their sushi loving world! You blood glucose will thank you, your waistband will thank you, your heart/cholesterol will thank you….. and your, pocketbook…. well, it is a small price to pay to be happy, healthy and a skinny minny!!

What are your favorite sushi items? If you go and try it for the 1st time, please let me know what you think!

Have a wonderful day!

The (Sushi Lovin’) Dishing Diabetic

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How About Some Pudding, Puddin’?

I must offer you all a confession.  I suffer from a serious condition known as DDS – Diabetic Deprivation Syndrome.  My DDS is brought on by a decreased intake of foods containing the main ingredient sugar, which gives these foods a sweet taste and gives my taste buds their very own rave party!  I have severe onset DDS in the evening, during my post-dinner hours.  I also have panic-induced DDS as I truly fear for my life if my day does not end on a “sweet” note!!  I have too much to live for that not rising to see another day at the hands of DDS is not an option.  I also have too much to live for that letting too much sugar cross my lips is not an option.  So, what is a girl (with type II diabetes) to do?

I do find some comfort in my suspicion that many of my fellow diabetics also suffer from DDS.  Although it may result from breads, pastas, potatoes or rice – we all share this terrifying syndrome.  What is it they say about misery loving company?  I am fairly certain, even in the absence of scientific proof, that I am not facing this condition alone (who needs scientific proof….. just visit one diabetic message board and you will see DDS running rampant!).

So, for all of you with my type of DDS…. the type resulting from a sugar deficiency….. try ending your day on this note –

How about a little pudding, puddin’?

1/2 c. Jell-o brand fat free, sugar free white chocolate pudding (follow prep instructions on box) – 1 Weight Watchers point, 6g carbs

1 Tbsp Heath toffee bits (found on the baking aisle with the chocolate chips) 2 Weight Watchers points, 9g carbs

Yep, that’s right…. toffee bits!!  Hello rave party for my taste buds (and hello on-target bed time blood glucose #’s! *Depending on what you ate for dinner of course).

Top the 1/2 c. of pudding with the 1 Tbsp. toffee bits and good-bye DDS (for tonight at least).

Another FANTASTIC topping your pudding – 1/2 c. fresh blueberries (10g carbs).

I wish you all the very best in your own personal battle with DDS.  Please share your success stories for defeating this “life threatening” condition.

Til tomorrow, puddin’,

The Dishing Diabetic

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The Tale of the Deadly Diabetic Diablo Burger

Last week I posted It’s Burger Time, Baby (https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/09/its-burger-time-baby/).  This was a fantastic moment as I discovered I could have a hamburger and keep my blood sugar on target.  I am talking about a burger WITH a bun, not a bun-less burger (aka a ground meat patty with salad on top).  One thing I failed to mention in that posting is exactly what kick started the burger craze that is currently taking place in my home.  Think about one of the most cruel television programs known to diabetics.  This is how I refer to the Travel Channel’s MAN V. FOOD!  Mr. Man LOVES this program.  We pretty much don’t miss an episode.  If you have never seen it, think – a man highlighting the “biggest” foods and eating challenges in different cities.  Hamburgers routinely make the list.  I think I have literally seen every combination of the most bizarre ingredients imaginable – think a fried egg and peanut butter on your hamburger!  Yes, on the same burger!

I am pretty much a sucker when it comes to Mr. Man and I enjoy making him happy.  And, you know what they say…… the way to a man’s heart….. Well, this diabetes thing put a pretty big dent in the menu of items I prepare now.  He is an absolute champ as he scarfs down spaghetti sauce over steamed zucchini while complimenting me on how good it is (I told you – CHAMP!); however, I still look for ways to cook meals that are exciting and new AND are blood sugar friendly!  Enter MAN V. FOOD and the grand idea to replicate one of the burgers highlighted on the show (replacing ingredients with their low fat, whole wheat versions).  How difficult could this be – jalapenos, serrano peppers, onion ring, low fat cream cheese, 96% fat free ground beef, whole wheat bun?  Not difficult at all if you don’t count nearly killing Mr. Man, MiMi, our 2 yr old – oh, and myself!!

There is no way to tell you last night’s happenings that could possibly detail the hilarity that ensued; but, I am going to try.  I mixed the 1lb ground beef with ground pepper, garlic salt and A1 steak sauce, divided into 5 patties and set aside.  I sliced 4 slices of onion, leaving the rings intact, and set aside.  I chopped the 6 jalapenos and 6 serrrano peppers and put in a bowl.  In a small mixing bowl I mixed about 1/3 c flour, 1 egg, 2 c fat free milk, chili powder & ground pepper and set aside.  In a skillet I put 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil and heated it up.  I then poured the bowl of chopped peppers into the oil to sauté.  Did I mention that I did not de-seed the peppers?  I have been known to exaggerate a time or two, but I am not stretching the truth AT ALL when I tell you that within minutes my entire family was sneezing, coughing, hacking, and gasping.

I have never experienced ANYTHING like this.  The rest of my family was driven to waiting for dinner in the backyard; while I bravely faced the peppers inside (with the help of a trusty bandana tied around my face).  I am NOT kidding!  If anyone knows how this happened, please share!  Do the seeds put off a gas as they cook?  Was it the peppers?  The jokes at my expense are nowhere near slowing and I have to tell you, I absolutely deserve it!  As soon as I turned off the heat and moved the skillet the relentless “pepper burn” came to and end almost as quickly as it began.  However, I was a fool to think this evening was anywhere near over.

I went on my way…… I dipped each onion slice in batter, let as much batter drip off as possible and lightly fried them in extra virgin olive oil.  The patties were cooked on the grill.  When they were ready I carefully constructed my masterpieces.  From the bun up: fried onion slice, meat patty, 2 BIG spoonfuls of peppers, and 2 slices reduced fat cream cheese laid side by side, top bun.  They were beautiful, smelled heavenly and would hopefully be very kind to my blood sugar.  After one bite it was clear….. these would forever be known as the Deadly Diabetic Diablo Burgers. Although my blood sugar handled them well, there was nothing kind about these burgers.  There he sat, trying to maintain his “champ” status with sweat drenching his brow as he complimented the meal.  He actually said, “my scalp is itching.”  What kind of pepper can make one’s scalp itch? I could not even finish my burger and that has to be a first!!

I THINK the outcome might have been pleasurable if I had de-seeded the peppers; but, I am too emotionally scarred to try again. It will a very long time before I attempt to replicate anything involving peppers. This will go down as one of my funniest, potentially dangerous, cooking snafus!

Smile, Laugh, Love!!

The Dishing Diabetic

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