Tag Archives: blood glucose

A Breakfast Believer!

Whether weight loss is your game or managing your diabetes (or both), you have heard, “breakfast is the most important meal of the day” at least once.  Most of us actually heard this at some point growing up or in the process of growing up our own family.  Back then it had to do with being at our best during the school day and hopefully having our brain function optimally.  These days, it has more to do with trying to jump start a metabolism that has decided to enjoy early retirement or trying to bring down a fasting blood glucose number that seems to peak first thing in the morning.

Breakfast.  Just the word conjures visions of french toast, banana nut pancakes, bacon, sausage links, biscuits, gravy, piggies in the blanket….. mmmmmmmmmm! For a weight loss crusader or a diabetic defender, these visions will stay just that….. visions.  As a faithful follower of Weight Watchers, I know that you can treat yourself to these every once in awhile, especially if you manage your allotted daily points in a way that allows it.  However, as a diabetic there is a question as to the definition of “once in awhile” and as for this diabetic….. treating myself once just creates a vicious craving that I would rather be without!  And, bottomline, although those breakfast choices are once-in-awhile options, breakfast is not.  Breakfast should be an everyday occurrence for an endless list of reasons; after all, it is the most important meal of the day!

Breakfast.  Just the word conjures a steady stream of excuses…… I don’t like to eat in the morning, I don’t have time to eat in the mornings, I am not hungry in the mornings, nixing breakfast helps cut 1/3 of the day’s calories, yada yada yada.  When I first started Weight Watchers in 2005 I was one of those I-don’t-like-to-eat-in-the-morning people.  After a few months I became very frustrated with losing an average of less than 1 pound a week.  My group leader re-addressed the topic of breakfast and its effects on weight loss with me. I decided, heck, if I could figure out how to enjoy exercise, I could figure out how to enjoy breakfast!  My new routine became ½ cup of original Fiber One cereal mixed into a 98% fat free Yoplait yogurt, 1 small banana and a large glass of water.  Within a month or so of adding breakfast to my day, my average weekly weight loss increased to 1.5lbs a week.  I became a Breakfast Believer!

So, my ½ cup of original Fiber One cereal mixed into a 98% fat free Yoplait yogurt, 1 small banana and a large glass of water became my daily breakfast.  The only part that varied was the flavor of yogurt. For 3 years – over 1,000 days that included a pregnancy – this was my Old Faithful of breakfasts.  When I received my diagnosis of type 2 diabetes in October 2009, I was left utterly dumbfounded.  Yes, Old Faithful was healthy; yes, it had contributed greatly to my weight loss (93 lbs) and to my efforts to maintain my loss; yes, it seemed responsible for keeping my “plumbing” in good order; however, in an instant, the arrival of diabetes turned my old friend to a new foe!

This value of this breakfast had been quantified for years as “3 points.”  This is fantastic in a Weight Watchers World.  Now, it was quantified as “65g carbohydrates.”  This is known as one big fat no-no in a type 2 diabetes world.  Every diabetic is different and their blood sugar responds to different foods at different times of the day.  I tried everything.  I tried Fiber One and water, yogurt and water, Fiber One and the banana, the banana and water….. you get my drift.  My blood sugar was just not on board with any of the combinations.  Now I was stuck.  I needed to lose 80 lbs, so I knew I needed to eat breakfast.  My mornings are CRAZY trying to get myself ready for work and my 2 year old ready for school.  I needed an new Old Faithful.  It needed to be delicious, fast, low carb AND low points.  How’s that for high maintenance??

Two fellow Weight Watchers turned me on to Egg Beaters.  Now, I had eaten them before and I loved them.  The key to this “turn on” was that they let me in on a little secret……. THEY CAN BE MICROWAVED!  Who knew?  Microwaved egg substitute out of a carton gave rise to my current Old Faithful.  Not only is it “5 points” and “18g carbs (11 net)”…… it can be prepared in less than 4 minutes and yes, I have timed it on multiple occasions!  The punch line – my blood glucose is routinely 120ish 2 hours after my 1st bite. I take the ingredients for the week to work every Monday morning so that i am never left empty handed and tempted to just wait it out until lunch.

A Breakfast Believer’s Breakfast Burrito – 5 Weight Watchers Points, 18g carbs/7g fiber

1/2 c Egg Beaters

1 Mission low carb small flour tortilla

1 Tbsp salsa

1/4 c Weight Watchers shredded cheese

1/2 small or 1/4 large avocado, sliced

Microwave bow of Egg Beaters for 2 minutes, stirring about every 30 seconds.  While microwaving eggs, place tortilla on plate and put cheese on tortilla.  When eggs are finished put on top of cheese.  Top eggs with salsa and sliced avocado. Breakfast Bliss!

Whether we are hustling ourselves to work or hustling children to school, breakfast is just an easy thing to miss.  However, once you experience the impact the most important meal of the day can have on your weight loss efforts or how the right breakfast may help decrease your blood glucose faster than skipping a morning meal, you  too, will be a breakfast believer!

Do you have an Old Faithful?  I would love to hear what made you a Breakfast Believer!

The Dishing Diabetic

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Take This Guarantee and Shove It!

If you are diabetic and have taken to the internet, then you know there is a TON of information out there. It also seems as if most diabetes websites have a “community” aspect to them where you can create your own profile, establish a blog, network with new friends and chat via message boards….. kind of like a diabetic Facebook! The sites are nothing short of a lifeline for both diabetic “rookies” and “lifers.” I troll through the many message boards observing the themes associated with the different stages of type 2 diabetes. I do occasionally comment with the intent to ask a question, answer a question, share a recipe, offer encouragement, etc. I do have 2 rules in the thoughts I put out there 1) no negativity and 2) no confrontations. Yesterday, I semi-broke #2.

I read a message board entry that stated that all diabetic will experience complications, especially if diagnosed young How do you NOT confront that statement? It is like it reached out of the computer and slapped me in the face. If that is true, why am I counting Weight Watchers Points, counting carbohydrates, pricking my find 4-5x/ day, exercising like a mad woman, and why is a blog like this even necessary? Well, I’ll tell you why…. because, despite what my precious 15 year old stepdaughter says, I AM young. I was 31 when I had borderline gestational diabetes and I was 33 when I was diagnosed with type II. I am young and I know diabetic complications are not guaranteed to be part of my future. And, young or old (aka young at heart), I want you to know that the same goes for you!

That statement, even in all its inaccuracy, did raise a few thoughts about the nature of diabetic complications and how we are instructed to prevent them. Many of us have WONDERFUL physicians, I personally have the BEST ; ). However, due to the nature of their job, they give us a glucometer and refer us to a class or individual nutritionist where we learn how many carbs to eat, what kind to eat, when to check our blood glucose and the recommended ranges for blood sugar. Many of us walk away with the assumption that managing our blood glucose is all we need to do to prevent diabetic complications, I know I did. Good thing I am married to a medical student!

Mr. Man, a 3rd year med student, attended a luncheon this week featuring a leading endocrinologist. This gentleman discussed how doctors must begin coaching their diabetic patients to do more than just manage blood sugar. The management of blood sugar is for 3 things in particular – preventing neuropathy, retinopathy and nephropathy. These are 3 very serious common complications of diabetes; but, there are many others and 2 biggies are heart disease and stroke. As a diabetic, preventing heart disease and stroke goes beyond just managing my blood sugar. I, personally, needed to lose 85 lbs (I have 35 more to go). I had to use both diet and exercise so that I would lower my cholesterol (now 150, down from 282 – without medication), lower my blood pressure (now 102/78 without medication), lower my A1c (now 6.1, down from 7.2 without medication) AND lose weight. I am lucky that I quit smoking 3 years ago or smoking cessation would have been added to my to-do list. Obesity, lack of exercise, hyperglycemia and smoking are huge risk factors for heart disease and stroke and managing blood glucose only addresses the hyperglycemia. The guest speaker’s point was received loud and clear: If an diabetic does not lose weight, lower their cholesterol, stop smoking, and/or start exercising they will die from a heart attack or stroke; but, hey, their blood sugar will be on target.

I was diagnosed 10 months ago and just learning to control my blood sugar was all I could handle. About 3 months in I began the weight loss and exercising. You have to start somewhere with baby steps, one at a time. Tackling it all at once would have left me feeling overwhelmed and frustrated…… 2 emotions that are not helpful in the world of managing diabetes and preventing its complications. This is a marathon, not a sprint, and it requires more than just monitoring your blood glucose. My suggestion is to create a timeline for your attack on diabetes. How many months will you focus on learning what foods you can eat and how they affect your blood sugar? When will you begin exercising (what kind, how often, etc)? Once you have that habit in place, when and how will you begin smoking cessation? Give yourself time to adjust to each new baby step and then take the next step. As you step in the ring to fight the good fight…. know there is hope; the proof is in the #’s….. 80% of diabetic complications are preventable! You will find many, many others at all stages of the marathon and most will want to help and encourage you; and, when you are ready to take the next step and add weight loss, exercise, and/or smoking cessation…… well, we will be here for that, too!

Yes, as diabetics we have to do so much more that just monitoring our BG to stay healthy and prevent complications…… but, the good news is that these complications, 80% of them, are preventable. I broke my #2 rule, no confontations regarding others’ posts….. but I felt the message was worth every word!

Have a wonderful weekend!

The Dishing Diabetic

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Use Protection! Cover Your (sushi) Roll in Cucumber…

If you read my blog on The Deadly Diabetic Diablo burger (https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/18/the-tale-of-the-deadly-diabetic-diablo-burger/), you know my feelings on The Travel Channel’s program MAN V. FOOD. I find it to be some twisted form of tortuous punishment for a type II diabetic. This evening I found the show’s host eating mass quantities of a food I CAN NOT LIVE WITHOUT and that I can still eat as often as I want to (guilt free!) – sushi, specifically spicy tuna rolls.

A little background: Nine years ago I was living near the gulf coast in a city that had no shortage of seafood or sushi restaurants. I was dating Mr. Man and he was playing a pretty good game of hard to get….. only allowing one date a week and these usually took place on Sunday nights. These “date nights” quickly took on a very predictable routine. Mr. Man would come over for dinner and a movie. He would begin these evenings begging me to go eat sushi with him. Seafood has been my favorite food for as long as I can remember…… but, I must empahsize – I only ate my seafood cooked and had never even entertained the alternative.

It took about 3 months of begging to wear me down. Well, if I am completely honest, it may have been 3 months of his playing hard to get had made me a level of desperate that I never knew existed. Either way, I caved and found myself sitting at a local sushi bar. Mr. Man was exceptionally kind in the items he chose to order, even though he started the evening tricking me into eating a bit of wasabi (japanese horseradish). There was a tiger eye roll (smoked salmon, cream cheese and jalapeno), a spicy tuna roll with avocado, and an eel/avocado roll; you could also call this the Sushi Beginners Menu. I LOVED every bite and a sushi addict was born!! *I am pretty sure this is when he decided to quit playing hard to get! ; )

Although sushi can pack a punch to your pocketbook, it does not add to your waistline or backside. When I decided I was tired of being fat (my story:https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/who-is-the-dishing-diabetic/), sushi became a staple in my journey to lose 93 lbs. Most sushi items are low points on the Weight Watchers plan, low fat, high protein and DELICIOUS. I have not found any scientific evidence to support my next claim, but it’s my story and I’m sticking to it….. sushi just flat makes me happy. My assumption is it either sets off chemical reactions that release endorphines, contains “happy” vitamins and minerals OR the fact that I can eat A LOT of it without guilt results in the emotional experience that accompanies my trips to the sushi bar…… I don’t really care how it happens, it just does.

As most of you reading this can relate, my diagnosis of type II diabetes was like a machete to the list of my favorite foods. That list was sliced and diced to a point where very few foods remained that were diabetic friendly. One food that shined like a beacon on that list….. SUSHI! Rice? Doesn’t sushi have rice, you ask? Nope! Your don’t need no stinkin’ rice to enjoy sushi!! Allelujah!! Sushi restaurants are bottomless treasure chests of delectible food choices and the beauty is that you can taylor your choices to fit your needs.

How is this possible? 1st of all, you can ask to have your favorite rolls wrapped in cucumber. A spicy tuna roll with avocado wrapped in cucumber is pure bliss and my blood sugar loves it, too! Or, try asking for a bowl of seaweed salad, avocado and your favorite fish in it (mine is salmon, tuna and yellow tail). Oh, and have them put a little spicy sauce in it! Also, look for thin-sliced peppered tuna on the appetizer menu; the thin sliced yellow tail is wonderful, too! Both are fabulous with spicy ponzu sauce. I also eat pieces of salmon, smoked salmon, tuna, super white tuna, sea bass, flounder, and yellow tail sashimi style…. meaning no rice. I will tell you though, I did not graduate to the sashimi until I had worked my way through Beginner’s sushi (rolls) and intermediate sushi (the seaweed salad). Sushi is like wine…. you acquire the taste for it and that tast just grows and grows and GROWS! I now enjoy it all and so does my weight loss plan AND my diabetes management plan! ** I do not eat sushi items that include “tempura” ingredients as that means “fried”**

If you have tried sushi and know it is not for you, I understand. However, if you are like I was 9 long years ago and claim you do not like it (but you have never tried it), I urge you, RUN, don’t walk to a sushi bar close to you. Take a sushi eater with you and do not hesitate to ask your sushi companion (or your server) any question you have. Sushi addicts LOVE to help bring another sushi addict into their sushi loving world! You blood glucose will thank you, your waistband will thank you, your heart/cholesterol will thank you….. and your, pocketbook…. well, it is a small price to pay to be happy, healthy and a skinny minny!!

What are your favorite sushi items? If you go and try it for the 1st time, please let me know what you think!

Have a wonderful day!

The (Sushi Lovin’) Dishing Diabetic

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How About Some Pudding, Puddin’?

I must offer you all a confession.  I suffer from a serious condition known as DDS – Diabetic Deprivation Syndrome.  My DDS is brought on by a decreased intake of foods containing the main ingredient sugar, which gives these foods a sweet taste and gives my taste buds their very own rave party!  I have severe onset DDS in the evening, during my post-dinner hours.  I also have panic-induced DDS as I truly fear for my life if my day does not end on a “sweet” note!!  I have too much to live for that not rising to see another day at the hands of DDS is not an option.  I also have too much to live for that letting too much sugar cross my lips is not an option.  So, what is a girl (with type II diabetes) to do?

I do find some comfort in my suspicion that many of my fellow diabetics also suffer from DDS.  Although it may result from breads, pastas, potatoes or rice – we all share this terrifying syndrome.  What is it they say about misery loving company?  I am fairly certain, even in the absence of scientific proof, that I am not facing this condition alone (who needs scientific proof….. just visit one diabetic message board and you will see DDS running rampant!).

So, for all of you with my type of DDS…. the type resulting from a sugar deficiency….. try ending your day on this note –

How about a little pudding, puddin’?

1/2 c. Jell-o brand fat free, sugar free white chocolate pudding (follow prep instructions on box) – 1 Weight Watchers point, 6g carbs

1 Tbsp Heath toffee bits (found on the baking aisle with the chocolate chips) 2 Weight Watchers points, 9g carbs

Yep, that’s right…. toffee bits!!  Hello rave party for my taste buds (and hello on-target bed time blood glucose #’s! *Depending on what you ate for dinner of course).

Top the 1/2 c. of pudding with the 1 Tbsp. toffee bits and good-bye DDS (for tonight at least).

Another FANTASTIC topping your pudding – 1/2 c. fresh blueberries (10g carbs).

I wish you all the very best in your own personal battle with DDS.  Please share your success stories for defeating this “life threatening” condition.

Til tomorrow, puddin’,

The Dishing Diabetic

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The Tale of the Deadly Diabetic Diablo Burger

Last week I posted It’s Burger Time, Baby (https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/09/its-burger-time-baby/).  This was a fantastic moment as I discovered I could have a hamburger and keep my blood sugar on target.  I am talking about a burger WITH a bun, not a bun-less burger (aka a ground meat patty with salad on top).  One thing I failed to mention in that posting is exactly what kick started the burger craze that is currently taking place in my home.  Think about one of the most cruel television programs known to diabetics.  This is how I refer to the Travel Channel’s MAN V. FOOD!  Mr. Man LOVES this program.  We pretty much don’t miss an episode.  If you have never seen it, think – a man highlighting the “biggest” foods and eating challenges in different cities.  Hamburgers routinely make the list.  I think I have literally seen every combination of the most bizarre ingredients imaginable – think a fried egg and peanut butter on your hamburger!  Yes, on the same burger!

I am pretty much a sucker when it comes to Mr. Man and I enjoy making him happy.  And, you know what they say…… the way to a man’s heart….. Well, this diabetes thing put a pretty big dent in the menu of items I prepare now.  He is an absolute champ as he scarfs down spaghetti sauce over steamed zucchini while complimenting me on how good it is (I told you – CHAMP!); however, I still look for ways to cook meals that are exciting and new AND are blood sugar friendly!  Enter MAN V. FOOD and the grand idea to replicate one of the burgers highlighted on the show (replacing ingredients with their low fat, whole wheat versions).  How difficult could this be – jalapenos, serrano peppers, onion ring, low fat cream cheese, 96% fat free ground beef, whole wheat bun?  Not difficult at all if you don’t count nearly killing Mr. Man, MiMi, our 2 yr old – oh, and myself!!

There is no way to tell you last night’s happenings that could possibly detail the hilarity that ensued; but, I am going to try.  I mixed the 1lb ground beef with ground pepper, garlic salt and A1 steak sauce, divided into 5 patties and set aside.  I sliced 4 slices of onion, leaving the rings intact, and set aside.  I chopped the 6 jalapenos and 6 serrrano peppers and put in a bowl.  In a small mixing bowl I mixed about 1/3 c flour, 1 egg, 2 c fat free milk, chili powder & ground pepper and set aside.  In a skillet I put 3 Tbsp. extra virgin olive oil and heated it up.  I then poured the bowl of chopped peppers into the oil to sauté.  Did I mention that I did not de-seed the peppers?  I have been known to exaggerate a time or two, but I am not stretching the truth AT ALL when I tell you that within minutes my entire family was sneezing, coughing, hacking, and gasping.

I have never experienced ANYTHING like this.  The rest of my family was driven to waiting for dinner in the backyard; while I bravely faced the peppers inside (with the help of a trusty bandana tied around my face).  I am NOT kidding!  If anyone knows how this happened, please share!  Do the seeds put off a gas as they cook?  Was it the peppers?  The jokes at my expense are nowhere near slowing and I have to tell you, I absolutely deserve it!  As soon as I turned off the heat and moved the skillet the relentless “pepper burn” came to and end almost as quickly as it began.  However, I was a fool to think this evening was anywhere near over.

I went on my way…… I dipped each onion slice in batter, let as much batter drip off as possible and lightly fried them in extra virgin olive oil.  The patties were cooked on the grill.  When they were ready I carefully constructed my masterpieces.  From the bun up: fried onion slice, meat patty, 2 BIG spoonfuls of peppers, and 2 slices reduced fat cream cheese laid side by side, top bun.  They were beautiful, smelled heavenly and would hopefully be very kind to my blood sugar.  After one bite it was clear….. these would forever be known as the Deadly Diabetic Diablo Burgers. Although my blood sugar handled them well, there was nothing kind about these burgers.  There he sat, trying to maintain his “champ” status with sweat drenching his brow as he complimented the meal.  He actually said, “my scalp is itching.”  What kind of pepper can make one’s scalp itch? I could not even finish my burger and that has to be a first!!

I THINK the outcome might have been pleasurable if I had de-seeded the peppers; but, I am too emotionally scarred to try again. It will a very long time before I attempt to replicate anything involving peppers. This will go down as one of my funniest, potentially dangerous, cooking snafus!

Smile, Laugh, Love!!

The Dishing Diabetic

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Test Strip Tyranny

I am going to step out on a limb here and say that having type II diabetes means facing a number of obstacles – emotional, nutritional and physical.  Upon diagnosis, the barrage of  emotions – shock, confusion, denial, anger, grief – is staggering.  It is not a stretch to say that life as you knew it is a thing of the past.  You now have to learn how to eat, drink, exercise, test your blood and the most optimal times throughout the day to do those things.  Nutritionally, you must learn how everything – food, drink, exercise, medication – will affect your blood sugar and how to modify each of those things address blood glucose readings that are too high or too low.  Physically, you endure the side effects of your new diet and the addition of exercise to your routine.  For me, I struggled to find the time to have type II diabetes and be a med student’s wife, a mother, a stepmother, and an employee.  This thing literally comes at you from every direction.  There is one source of constant feedback that becomes your lifeline….. your glucometer and test strips.  The ability to “TEST, TEST, TEST” (you will see this mantra on almost all of the diabetes message boards) allows a type II diabetic to know how their diet and their exercise affects their blood glucose levels without any side effects (technology is so advanced now that most of us don’t even endure sore fingers!).

I am going to go out on another limb and say that those that test are those that have made managing their diabetes and preventing diabetic complications a priority in their daily life.  Although the diabetic benefits the most from these efforts, the general population benefits as well.  Just research the biggest contributors to escalating healthcare costs in this country.  You will see the rising obesity rates and the dramatic impact they have on healthcare’s “bottom line.”  Anywhere you see the term “obesity,” diabetes, heart disease and hypertension (bit of humor: my sweet friend who is a nurse calls this the Texas Trio) are sure to follow.  The cost of diabetic complications is exorbitant to the patient, those that care for them and the healthcare system.  When you consider the financial cost and that 80% of diabetic complications are preventable it becomes apparent how imperative prevention is for so many reasons.  Prevention can not be accomplished by new legislation, healthcare reform, or by those that love a diabetic.  Prevention is up to each type II diabetic and those that are at high risk for developing the disease (pre-diabetics). Daily blood glucose testing is central to successful prevention.  It is a simple and painless method to help manage diabetes; however, always having supplies on hand may not always be so simple.

I recently called my pharmacy to refill my test strips.  I was told that my insurance company did not approve the request because it was too “soon” since my last refill.  WHAT?  ARE YOU KIDDING ME?  We are talking about little pieces of plastic that collect my blood.  We are not talking about pills, syrups, or anything else that could be harmful if not controlled.  We are talking about test strips.  We are talking about blood glucose management.  We are talking about preventing diabetic complications.  We are talking about decreasing the costs of healthcare associated with the 80% of diabetic complications that are preventable.  This just absolutely amazes me.  These things should be passed out like candy to diabetics.  There should be test-strip-bowls in every endocrinologist’s office just like the lollipop bowls at the pediatrician’s.  Of all the obstacles diabetics face, obtaining test strips should NOT be one. Those that test are those that have made managing their diabetes and preventing diabetic complications a priority in their daily life.  Those that test are making a responsible decision that affects their life, the lives of those that love them and they are contributing – with every single pin prick – to the effort to reduce the cost of healthcare in this country.

So, until my doctor puts out a test-strip-bowl, I am left with 2 choices.  1) Test no more than 3 times a day OR 2) end up going whole days without testing until my insurance agency gives my pharmacy the green light to dispense me my little pieces of plastic. I can tell you that neither option agrees with me and, I am going to step out on another limb here, I am pretty sure the thousands of people on all of the wonderful diabetic message boards would agree.  From what I can tell from these amazing folks, we are all working to stay off medications, to take less or be taken off medication completely, to lose weight, the lower our blood glucose levels….. to PREVENT the diabetic complications that are guaranteed if we do not successfully manage are blood glucose.  This management begins when we “TEST, TEST, TEST” our blood glucose.

This was more of a venting, slightly political entry.  I apologize if I have offended anyone.  Have any of you faced this obstacle and found a way to overcome it?  If so, please share.

The Dishing Diabetic

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Sometimes the Insides Just Get Old

When I was little I LOVED to find out what was on the inside of everything.  I would literally take apart batteries (without my mother’s knowledge of course – um, battery acid?!??!?), I disassembled the family VCR, I even dissected a dead snake at the age of 7 (at girl scout camp).  All of this was in the name of wanting to know what was inside. Unfortunately, not much has changed in my “old” age.  I still seem to be interested in what is hidden on the inside.  My husband’s 1st class in medical school was anatomy.  He would come home and tell me about something “cool” he had seen, like, say the woman who had undescended testes!!!  And, on more than one occasion, I would demand that he take me to the anatomy lab so I could “see”.  I realize that this paragraph might lead you to make certain assumptions or judgements about me and I have never even attempted to convince anyone that I am 100% normal. My theory is the only ones to worry about are those that claim they are normal.  The rest of us are just self aware and as I like to say – self awareness is half the battle!

Lately, it seems my curiosity with the “insides” has decreased .  This change may be attributed to receiving my type II diabetes diagnosis.  I have talked about the list (you know, the “Foods I love and can not eat anymore” list) that takes shape when you are diagnosed and in those 1st few months seems to grow every time you have a craving (in the beginning it feels like EVERY craving gets added to the list). The list, in time, has to be accepted and just dealt with.  It gets so long that it is like a wet, flannel blanket covering your emotional state of mind.  As soon as you shuck it, you are in much better shape to face the beast and fight the good fight!  Plus,  eventually you learn how to “manipulate” the list so that it fits with your new lifestyle.  However, this acceptance and manipulation seems to have triggered a whole new irritation…… makes me think of that law, you know the one, “for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.”  This is officially know as Newton’s Third Law of Motion (1st Ochham’s Razor <https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/14/weigh-day-wake-up-and-a-wal-mart-surprise/&gt;, now Newton….  I thought we were talking about type II diabetes??)  Anyway, it appears that my acceptance and cheery outlook regarding the “list” gave way to a growing disenchantment with the insides.

The insides.  It is beginning to feel like my diet is made up of the insides.  The insides of the wrap at Roly Poly, the insides of the enchiladas/tacos/tacos al carbon/taco salad at Chuy’s, the insides of the sandwich at Subway, the insides of the hamburger at Five Guys Burgers, the insides of the stromboli at Double Dave’s, the insides of the chili cheese dog at Coney Island, the insides of the quiche at Home Cafe, the insides of the breakfast burrito at JC’s burritios, the insides of the philly cheesesteak at Texadelphia……  ENOUGH of the insides!  Seriously, people.  Manipulating my “list” basically required me to remove the outside in order get at least a distorted taste of some of my favorite foods and the result has been a growing annoyance with the “insides”!  Hmph!!

Part of being on the “rookie” side of this disease is A LOT of going to extremes and trial and error.  I have clearly mastered the going to extremes….. not eating the foods AT ALL, then eating them but removing the “outsides”.  I am beginning to feel the extremism giving way to the trial and error phase.  I am just beginning to stick my toes in the pool of “trying” because I am very fearful of the “error”.  My 1st attempt was a hamburger made at home with a whole wheat bun (https://thediabeticdish.wordpress.com/2009/08/09/its-burger-time-baby/).  The result:  a very happy belly and an “on target” blood glucose reading.  I know as try more there will be some errors, but it will be worth it to find a balance between the insides and the outsides!

What are your favorite insides?  Have you found great ways to enjoy the outsides and still manage your blood glucose?  Tell me about, I would love to hear!

The Dishing Diabetic

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